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What language does Marlowe use to describe the charater of Dr Faustus Free essay! Download now

Home > GCSE > English literature > What language does Marlowe use to describe the charater of Dr Faustus

What language does Marlowe use to describe the charater of Dr Faustus

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Downloads to date: N/A | Words: 1130 | Submitted: 08-May-2012
Spelling accuracy: 98.4% | Number of pages: 4 | Filetype: Word .doc


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What language does Marlowe use to describe the charater of Dr Faustus essay previewWhat language does Marlowe use to describe the charater of Dr Faustus essay previewWhat language does Marlowe use to describe the charater of Dr Faustus essay preview

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Marlowe starts this final passage identical as the start the play. Faustus is alone delivering his soliloquy, expressing his thoughts and feelings. Although unlike the opening passage where Marlowe uses the text to display Faustus as a confident and arrogant man, he says ‘and be eternalised for some wondrous cure’ (Dr Faustus, Longman, Act 1, scene 1, 15) implying that his work is so great that it would be immortalised and made famous forever.

Whereas the final passage is somewhat opposite where Marlowe makes Faustus now appear frightened and fearful as realisation is that he is moments away from an eternity of damnation. His time left on earth is etching away from him ‘And then thou must be damned perpetually’ (Dr Faustus, Longman Act 5, Scene 2, 68)

Marlowe writes in the third person which makes Faustus appear to be talking to himself. This makes the passage more dramatic as it is an account of Faustus’ last desperate moments. Illustrating him as lonely, sad and pitiful on the brink of perpetual damnation.

Line 67 uses a collection of monosyllables ‘Now has s thou but one bare hour to live’ (Dr Faustus, Longman, Act 5, Scene 2, Line 67) this meteridge can be likened to the movement of a clock; the ticking , striking, reducing. This use of language links the clocks movements with Faustus’ life ticking away thus heightening ever impending fate that which Faustus will endure. The next line carries on using monosyllables ‘And then thou must be damned perpetually’ (Dr Faustus, Longman, Act 5, Scene 2, Line 68) however this is not the case for the last word which is a five syllable which emphasises it and emphasises that he will be doomed forever.

This realisation that the end is immanent ignites Faustus’ desire for time to stand still or to slow down.

Marlowe uses the lines that carry on quickly from one another to emphasis the meaninglessness of the situation. This is illustrated in the ‘Fair nature’s eye, rise, rise again and make perpetual day: or let this hour be but a year, a month, a week, a natural day’ (Dr Faustus, Longman, Act 5 Scene 2, Line 71) This technique that Marlowe uses appears to make the time pass quicker as the ensemble of words run into one another as if they were gathering speed eventually to Faustus’ doom.
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