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How does Charlotte Bronte Create Sympathy for Jane Eyre in Chapter One? Free essay! Download now

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How does Charlotte Bronte Create Sympathy for Jane Eyre in Chapter One?

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How does Charlotte Bronte Create Sympathy for Jane Eyre in Chapter One?
Charlotte Bronte creates sympathy towards Jane Eyre, which we begin to feel from the opening chapter in a number of ways. One choice that the author decides to make is the narrative perspective option. Narrative perspective is the technique by which the author chooses to relate the story to the reader, and in this case, the narrator is the protagonist (Jane Eyre) producing first person narrative.

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Charlotte Bronte creates sympathy towards Jane Eyre, which we begin to feel from the opening chapter in a number of ways. One choice that the author decides to make is the narrative perspective option. Narrative perspective is the technique by which the author chooses to relate the story to the reader, and in this case, the narrator is the protagonist (Jane Eyre) producing first person narrative. This is indicated by the use of personal pronouns: ‘I’ and ‘me’ which become perceptible from the second paragraph, “I was glad of it; I never liked long walks”. This quote shows the pronoun ‘I’ in use, describing Jane’s opinion, which immediately allows us to interact with the character, as every single reader will begin to ponder over his or her own judgement of the matter in hand. The first person narrative technique allows us to gain that sense of directness pointed to the reader and we are able to share each experience that Charlotte Bronte considered important in Jane’s lifetime. An example of the narrator connecting with the reader is in the final chapter of the book (chapter thirty-eight) where the first sentence is, “reader, I married him”. This shows that Jane wants to candidly address the reader by being personal as the novel is coming to its end. Never the less, although this quote is situated near the finish of the novel, the reader is also hauled close to Jane from the first chapter where the use of first person narrative authorises us to not only sympathise with Jane, but empathise alongside her too. An example of this is, “humbled by my consciousness of my physical inferiority” which shows us Jane is being honest with the reader and telling us the truth which guides us to believe in Jane and confide in her judgements of certain happenings and instances. Jane understood from a very early age that she was subordinate to her cousins, which taught her to expect nothing greater than the worst throughout her life, and therefore when she does gain wealth, she is extremely grateful of it. Additionally, the paragraph “a small breakfast room adjoined the drawing room ... I was shrined in double retirement” comprises a repetition of ‘I’ in copious amounts to keep the reader attached to the character of Jane, as it continuously reminds us that she is there and contains her own individuality and personality.
First person narrative enables the reader to take Jane’s expedition through life alongside her, creating sympathy towards Jane as we acknowledge her outlook on life. The novel is a Bildungsroman, showing Jane’s formative years and personal development. It also includes aspects of Jane’s earlier existence which give her the strength of character to cope with oncoming events. For instance, “mysterious often to my underdeveloped understanding and imperfect feelings” shows Jane admitting to the reader her disadvantages and what she is unable to do, which structures the story so we are prepared to discover how Jane’s skills progressed in the future. “English education, together with French, Drawing and Music” are the accomplishments Jane gains after her years at Lowood Institution – both schooling and teaching there.
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