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Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' and Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood', that shows the themes of 'Wasted Lives' and how it's conveyed. Free essay! Download now

Home > A Level > English > Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' and Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood', that shows the themes of 'Wasted Lives' and how it's conveyed.

Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' and Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood', that shows the themes of 'Wasted Lives' and how it's conveyed.

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Downloads to date: N/A | Words: 1742 | Submitted: 11-Jan-2012
Spelling accuracy: 97.0% | Number of pages: 3 | Filetype: Word .doc


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Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley\Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley\Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley\

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Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' and Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood', that shows the themes of 'Wasted Lives' and how it's conveyed.

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Find and compare two extracts from Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' and Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood', that shows the themes of 'Wasted Lives' and how it's conveyed.

In order to successfully analyse the presence and significance of the theme of 'wasted lives' in Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' and Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood', it is important to discuss the genre of both publications. The former is considered by many to be an early science-fiction novel, whilst the latter is a non-fiction novel taken from an almost fictional perspective.

The first half of the nineteenth century (of which 'Frankenstein' originates from) was seen as a dynamic period in French history, with the rise of Democracy and the end of Monarchy and Empire. This tied in with the significant development of French Literature, an area of writing dominated by Romanticism, a movement which is associated with many authors such as Percy Shelley (who became husband of Mary Shelley).

The war years of the early twentieth century had, as famously described by American author Ernest Hemingway, created a "lost generation" of writers, who would form very different attitudes to what had been before them. The likes of Hemingway were able to provide a previously unknown perspective on Literature, and this could be seen as a key influence in the initial composition of 'In Cold Blood'.

The 'Frankenstein' extract that I am using runs from pages 102-104, starting with "One day" and ending with "forever grateful". The 'In Cold Blood' extract that I am using runs from 280-282, starting with "Many observers" and ending with "idea, too". Both of these extracts form conversations between characters I deem to have wasted their lives, and those who's attention they're looking to seek.

Prior to the extract that I have chosen, Victor Frankenstein manages to 'awake' his own creature (having gained an insight into the creation of life). The outcome is something of an anti-climax though, and the "monster" is abandoned. Victor returns home to Geneva, having been told that his younger brother had been found murdered. Whilst in the Swiss capital, the protagonist is approach by his creation who, having been indirectly educated, begins to tell of its 'upbringing'.

'One day, when the sun shone on the red leaves that strewed the ground, and diffused cheerfulness, although it denied warmth'

The extract begins by setting the scene. The creation is on the verge of an attempt at befriending the old, blind grandfather of the De Lacey family. It's description of the weather does little to suggest that this is an extract from a book associated with the genre of Horror. The sun 'diffused cheerfulness'. This metaphor suggests that it was a pleasant day, visually the right day to improve your luck.

Complex sentences such ...

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