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Detailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III Free essay! Download now

Home > A Level > English > Detailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III

Detailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III

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Downloads to date: N/A | Words: 1732 | Submitted: 29-Mar-2011
Spelling accuracy: 97.9% | Number of pages: 3 | Filetype: Word .doc


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Detailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III essay previewDetailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III essay previewDetailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III essay preview

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Detailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III

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Detailed commentary on Othello and Iago passages in Act I Scene III
Act I Scene III is a very important scene in Othello due to the fact that this is the first time we see “the moor” (Othello) as well as Iagos’ true ambitions and plans in the form of a soliloquy. The use of two film interpretations also gives us alternative interpretations and an in depth display of how the characters interact with one another and their surroundings. This visual display coupled with the script itself allows us to subjectively focus on the use of language, staging and techniques in order to help define Othello and Iago as characters. This is the first time we also see Othello and Iago interact with other characters and each other for an extended period of time, this greatly aides us in comparing the two characters emotionally and linguistically.
Othello enters earlier on in the scene and says relatively little until line 127 where he is demanded to tell of how he fell in love with the Brabantios’ daughter (Desdemona) due to a rather accusing Brabantio. This passage up to line 169 is portrayed by Othello to be an eloquent story of true love; this is immediately seen with “Her father loved me”. Othello boasts of the many “battles, sieges [and] fortunes” that “[he has] passed” showing how his life of adventure greatly contrasts those of Brabantio who has lived a sheltered life and illustrating his many achievements. This story of his travel to far off exotic lands, being a slave (“sold to slavery”) and other dangers (“of moving accidents by field and flood”) he has encountered help to illustrate to the Duke and Brabantio that he is a strong individual who has had an exceptionally difficult life. This story could therefore be a device used to not only boast and show the pride Othello has but also for the councillors to take pity on him. The use of controlled repetition helps to speed the pace of the story and heighten the suspense, “Of hair-breadth scapes i’ the imminent deadly breach, Of being taken by the insolent foe”. The use of religious imagery and language is used several times throughout the story giving an idea of purity, innocence and righteousness in terms of the relationship between him and Desdemona being sanctified by God, “redemption thence”, “prayer of earnest heart”, “I would all my pilgrimage dilate”. The use of extremely descriptive imagery of “Rough quarries, rocks and hills whose heads tough heaven” shows both how Othello has had to tell this story so many times it is second nature to him, but also that these impressive feats that he has accomplished dismiss the stereotype of black ...

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