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“Chapter 35 demonstrates Darcy’s true character – a truthful, considerate man who follows his own moral code, regardless of the opinions of others” To what extent do you agree with this opinion? Free essay! Download now

Home > A Level > English > “Chapter 35 demonstrates Darcy’s true character – a truthful, considerate man who follows his own moral code, regardless of the opinions of others” To what extent do you agree with this opinion?

“Chapter 35 demonstrates Darcy’s true character – a truthful, considerate man who follows his own moral code, regardless of the opinions of others” To what extent do you agree with this opinion?

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Downloads to date: N/A | Words: 1602 | Submitted: 24-Apr-2012
Spelling accuracy: 99.2% | Number of pages: 1 | Filetype: Word .doc


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Pride and Prejudice, analysis of how Dracy comes across in the letter he writes in Chapter 35.

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“Chapter 35 demonstrates Darcy’s true character – a truthful, considerate man who follows his own moral code, regardless of the opinions of others”
To what extent do you agree with this opinion?
Throughout the book we as readers are persuaded to believe that Mr Darcy is, to a certain extent, a disagreeable man. His character from the start of the book is shown to be arrogant, proud and indifferent; upon entering the first ball in chapter 3 Darcy's character is exposed as "proud; to be above his company, and above being pleased..." his unwillingness to integrate or mingle in social settings with people he believes to be below himself supports this point. Austen slowly makes us feel more affectionate towards Darcy as his feelings grow for Lizzy and we see a more genuine side to him, however this is then affected by the story we hear told by Wickham. In chapter 35 we are faced with a very different side to Mr Darcy, as the chapter comprises mostly of a letter we are given a glimpse of Darcy's centre of consciousness, a rare insight into the full extent of his feelings. Austen very rarely had males holding the larger part of a conversation; she therefore used letters to reveal more about the male characters within the story rather than dialogue. At the start of the letter Darcy apologises for any alarm the receipt of the letter may cause and explains that his intentions are to set straight the charges against him and not to repeat the sentiments made the night before. This opening suggests to the reader that Darcy is not so arrogant but because he shows immediate concern for Elizabeth's feelings he has instead been misrepresented by his company and that Elizabeth's first impressions may have been wrong, possibly due to her own proud nature.
It is very clear from the start of Darcy’s letter that he is being extremely truthful; he consistently reveals his true feelings to Lizzy throughout it, regardless that the previous night she had refused his proposal. When he reveals the event between his sister and Mr Wickham, we know he must be telling the truth, as lying about something that shameful would be absurd, he reveals this despite the humiliation it would cause him and his family – showing his trust in Lizzy. He warns Lizzy at the beginning of the letter that he is going to being truthful irrespective of how it will affect her, he apologizes in advance for the hurt it may cause, but states he will still be frank with her:
“If, in the explanation of them, which is due to myself, I am under the necessity of ...

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